As experts try to predict where the market is headed this year, it appears that through all the continued turmoil, institutional construction will fare the best. Looking at 2010, the AIA Consensus Construction Forecast reported that while this year may bring disappointing news for non-residential construction, institutional construction will only experience a modest drop as compared to larger declines in the commercial sector*. Furthermore, stimulus money geared toward educational, healthcare and government buildings is predicted to cushion some of the blow felt by the institutional market. With an increased focus on healthcare, green construction will continue to be incorporated into healthcare projects. Studies show that natural light positively impacts mood and mental function**, making daylighting valuable in hospitals that seek to better patients' mental and emotional health. Below are two recent hospital projects featuring a range of Kawneer products, which not only helped provide an energy efficient building envelope, but also helped control natural light in the facilities.

Methodist Stone Oak Hospital
San Antonio, Texas

Located in San Antonio, the Methodist Stone Oak Hospital has been called a “hospital of the future.” The facility currently holds 132 beds and is capable of holding as many as 350 beds. Its design is visitor-friendly, complete with straightforward hospital navigation and specially designed waiting rooms. The hospital entrance provides easy access to “portals of care” for a variety of services ranging from treatment and testing to same-day surgery. Incanted patient rooms allow nurses to view patients from their station.

To withstand the building’s heavy traffic, Kawneer’s 500 Wide Stile doors were installed throughout. Curtain wall from Kawneer, as well as the company’s 1600 SunShade®, help create a feeling of openness and light. Throughout the project, designers were faced with challenging perimeter conditions and a large, expansive curtain wall that had to be engineered out; however, true partnerships between Kawneer and the project architects and glazing contractors enabled a job well done. The hospital opened its doors to patients on March 9, 2009. Touched by unique details like its large atrium areas, the final product is both attractive and architecturally impressive.

Architect:
HOK
New York, New York, USA

Glazing Contractor:
Win-Con Enterprises, Inc.
New Braunfels, Texas, USA

Products Used:
1600 Wall System®1 curtain wall
2250 IG (Inside Glazed) curtain wall
1600 SunShade®
500 Wide Stile Entrance

Salem Baptist Hospital
Salem, Oregon

Designed to meet the needs of a growing and aging population, the Salem Baptist Hospital, located in Salem, Oregon, recently underwent a large-scale renovation and addition. Project designers sought to accommodate evolving technology and to provide quality care while being cost-effective. The 160,000-square-foot renovation and 345,000-square-foot tower addition provide space for 120 more beds.

Created specifically to house emergency and critical-care related services, hospital designers worked to cultivate a stress-reducing environment. The building interior emphasizes daylighting and incorporates touches of nature with garden views and warm colors.

The combination of Kawneer’s 1600 SunShade® and 1600 Wall System®1 curtain wall help bring daylight to the hospital while providing a secure and energy-efficient building envelope. Additionally, Kawneer’s 350 Medium Stile Entrances provide extra strength for high traffic applications. Each of these products assisted designers in reaching their goals in terms of both quality and cost-effectiveness. The project was completed in late 2008.

Architect:
HKS, Inc.
Dallas, Texas, USA

Glazing Contractor:
Mountain Glass
Canby, Oregon, USA

Products used:
1600 Wall System®1 curtain wall
1600 SunShade®
350 Medium Stile Entrance

* AIArchitect: http://info.aia.org/aiarchitect/thisweek09/1218/1218b_consensus.cfm
** Mike Nicklas & Gary Bailey. “Energy Performance of Daylit Schools in North Carolina.” Buildgreenschools.org.